‘Explain’: Qld slammed over new border rule

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    After closing its border to some interstate arrivals, Queensland has been criticized, claiming it is “being loved to death”. Queensland has been charged by the federal government after closing its borders to some interstate arrivals, claiming it is “being loved to death”.

    It comes as another Queensland MP says he has been left “stateless” after receiving a text message telling him he was unable to return home to the Gold Coast until September 2, claiming the news was “extraordinary” and that “I haven’t told my wife yet”.

    Queensland premier Annastacia Palaszczuk announced that all arrivals from NSW, the ACT, and Victoria are banned from entering the Sunshine State today after claiming its hotel quarantine system is “overwhelmed” by these arrivals.

    But Finance Minister Simon Birmingham has asked Ms. Palaszczuk to explain after taking such a “large step”. Queensland recorded no new Covid cases, and two truck drivers who tested positive on Tuesday are now being classified as false positives.

    Qld slammed

    The premier said the pause on arrivals to Queensland from the three jurisdictions was in response to people “relocating to escape interstate lockdowns, placing huge pressure on our hotel quarantine system. “This is about keeping Queenslanders safe from the Delta variant,” Ms. Palaszczuk said.

    “Not only are our hotels stretched, but our staff is also stretched. We simply don’t have any room at the moment. “We don’t want to see Delta coming into our community. We do not have any room at the moment. Queensland is being loved to death.” She revealed as of Tuesday, August 24, more than 5100 people were staying in 22 quarantine hotels, with the majority of those (more than 3200) from interstate.

    The new rules mean no one currently in a declared hotspot across the country will be permitted to enter Queensland’s hotel quarantine for two weeks, except for those with exemptions such as compassionate reasons. New arrivals and Queensland residents will have to reapply for a border pass.

    Ms. Palaszczuk said she was forced to implement the new rules because the state was “scrambling” for quarantine hotels. “We are really concerned about the pressure that the hotel quarantine system is putting on our resources,” she said. But the federal government has questioned the decision, with Mr. Birmingham suggesting Queensland use home quarantine measures rather than driving people away.

    “I haven’t seen Queensland quite explain what’s driven this [decision] or how it’s working,” Mr. Birmingham told the ABC. “Many states and territories have effectively for Australian citizens being able to use different approaches to home-based quarantine. “That seems like a sensible way to enable at least essential movement across borders to have people come in, to have to do the 14 days.

    “I’ve done it myself a few times around during the pandemic, as many other Australians have, who’ve had to cross state borders but then face those requirements. “I understand the need for restrictions, but completely sealing off does seem like quite, quite a large step. “I think Queensland’s got to explain why it can’t manage to make those sort of home-based arrangements work at least for a cohort of people.”

    News.com.au contacted Mr. Birmingham’s office for further comment but was referred back to his interview with Patricia Karvelas. Meanwhile, the Minister for Employment, Stuart Robert, told Sky News Australia he received a text message from the Queensland government, which informed him that he could not return home to the Gold Coast until September 8.

    He expressed concern over “how many other thousands of Queenslanders” had received the same message with little to no notice that they were banned from returning. “Suddenly they’re going ‘what, I’m stateless, I’m locked out of my state until September 8’,” he said.

    “The premier has just said to Queensland residents you’re not welcome home … at what point does a premier say I know you live here, but you can’t come home and gave citizens two hours’ notice.” “I haven’t told my wife yet, by the way. It’s extraordinary,” Mr. Robert said. with Vanessa Brown

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